The 3 Fundamental Social Media Rules of Engagement

There are plenty of rules for social media engagement, and I have my own ever-growing list. But the more involved I get in social, the more I realize that there are three things that are absolutely critical:

1. Be Nice.

Even if you’re well-known among friends and associates for your cynical snark, the unkind are quickly ignored or worse in the social space. Don’t slam the competition. Don’t criticize your employer or colleagues. Don’t attack, even if attacked. No one comes away from social media fights looking good. If you disagree with someone or something, it may be not be easy to come up with a cogent argument for your position, but it’s much easier than doing damage control for your online reputation. [Read more…]

Facebook Fatigue? Not So Much.

Pew Research has released a new study on Facebook use, and there’s a lot of distress and hand-wringing over “Facebook fatigue” because the study and most reports I’ve seen lead with:

61% of Facebook users have taken a voluntary break from using the site at one time or another and 27% plan to spend less time on the site this coming year.

Hot stuff, and just the kind of grist the media likes to mill these days, but it’s not so hot in context. [Read more…]

Top 3 Super Bowl Takeaways for Internet Marketers

1. Social media rewards the opportunistic.

The Oreo Super Bowl ad was pretty bad. The “cream vs. cookie” campaign has had its moments, but taking it from sibling rivalry to raging violence seems to run counter to the image Oreo wants as “America’s favorite cookie.”

I guess it was supposed to be funny that the fights took place in a library and everyone was whispering. But that joke got very old very quickly. Instead, it was just another example of the extremes advertisers go to when they run out of good ideas.

But Oreo saved itself by jumping on Twitter when the power went out at the Superdome. Beginning with the “You Can Still Dunk in the Dark” tweet, it rode a wave real-time consumer engagement and post-event PR that no amount of paid advertising can match. [Read more…]